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What Can You Write in 15 Minutes?

I’m personally really bad for thinking, “oh, I only have an hour of free time. I don’t have time to settle into getting anything productive done.”
So I don’t.
I need to learn to better use the spare moments in life.

A Writer's Path


by Kelsie Engen

Writers can mostly agree that writing is a time consuming process. You write a first draft, step back, revise into a second draft, send out for feedback (beta readers or developmental editor), receive and revise, send for final edits, then finally submit and (possibly change) and then publish. Whew. I get tired just writing that list.

Then factor in this: Some authors spend a decade or more writing and perfecting their novels.

So…what can you possibly do in 15 minutes?

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WIP Thursday?

You may or (more likely) may not have noticed I haven't written any of my own posts in the past two weeks. It's supposed to be week three of Camp NaNoWriMo, but I'd say I'm official down and out for the count. This past week - yes, an entire week - I've been in bed, … Continue reading WIP Thursday?

Useful Tips for Self-Editing a Manuscript

Sorry I haven’t been writing original content of late; I’ll talk through it during my next WIP Wednesday blog.

A Writer's Path

 

by Emily Nemchick

Whilst there is no substitute for hiring a professional editor, self-editing is an important skill for any writer to hone. For one thing, the more passes a manuscript gets, the fewer errors will remain in the final product. If you are using an editor, be sure to self-edit thoroughly first so they can focus on the things you have missed. If you are not using an editor, then self-editing is doubly essential. Here are a few tips to make sure you catch as many errors as possible.

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NO ADVERBS: The Reason Behind the Rule

Going Verbal

If you’ve read any guide about improving your writing, you’ve heard the “No Adverbs” rule. Cross them out, delete them, take a tiny lighter and burn a hole through every –ly word that dares rear its ugly head until your manuscript looks like Swiss cheese, but don’t you ever, under any circumstances, ever use an adverb!

… Really?

Come on, folks. Adverbs are perfectly functional members of language society. It’s not their fault they’re so easily misused.

Adverbs are descriptors for verbs and adjectives, just like adjectives are descriptors for nouns. They tend to end in –ly, though there are adverbs that don’t (fast, regardless, seldom) and other non-adverb words that do (lovely, imply, gravelly).

(To quote a certain pirate movie: “Hang the code, and hang the rules. They’re more like guidelines anyway.”)

The problem arises when you use an adverb to support a word that’s not pulling…

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To All the People-Pleasers Trying to Write for a Living

Novelty Revisions

There’s something you need to know.

Whether you’re a seasoned writer or you’re just starting out, sometimes one of the most difficult parts of the job is something completely unexpected.

It’s not the actual writing. It’s not accepting critiques, making changes, doing what’s asked of you.

Actually, it’s something internal.

It’s having the self-respect to assert your needs as a writer.

I’ve written probably one too many times here about how writers are treated by other people (most of the time, it’s not well). I don’t write often enough about how we treat ourselves.

Sometimes I think we forget that, even though all we do is sit in a chair and type stuff all day, things happen. We need to ask for things from others. And we’re often either made to feel like we shouldn’t, or don’t believe we deserve to.

There are many things we cannot change about ourselves…

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How to Stop Feeling Ashamed of Old Writing Projects #ASMSG #SundayBlogShare

BlondeWriteMore

A few years ago your old writing project was the best thing ever. It put a spring in your step and a twinkle in your eye. At the time of writing this great literary masterpiece you were positive it would be the turning point in your literary career.

You spent hours, days, weeks and months working on this project. It was all you talked about and everyone around you was given a regular update on its progress, whether they wanted one or not. When you were not working on it you were busy daydreaming about…getting stuck in a lift with a literary agent, sneaking it out of your bag (all 300 A4 sheets) and whilst they were hammering on the lift emergency button you would whisper,“whilst wewait to be rescued, youcould read something I wrote…earlier…(cough cough)”.

Roll forward to the present day. The love you had for this project…

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Filter Words and Phrases to Avoid in Writing Fiction…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Filter words act like a veil between the reader and the character

by Kathy Steinemann  on Anne R. Allen site:

This article provides a list of writing filters, with practical examples of how to replace them. You’ll also find exercises that can double as story prompts.

All words exist for a reason. Use them wisely to create engaging narrative.

Why the fuss?

Filter words form a barrier that distances readers from a story.

Bertie felt the warm sand between her toes as she walked.

Bertie’s experience is relayed secondhand. When word economy is critical, this approach works. However, wouldn’t you rather become so involved that you almost feel it yourself?

With a few tweaks, we can strengthen the sentence.

The sand trickled between Bertie’s toes, radiating warmth with every step she took.

Strong verbs, trickled and radiating, amplify the sensory impact.

Five senses? Six? Twelve?

Most people can name…

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WIP Wednesday: Camp NaNoWriMo

NOTE: sorry this post is late! Apparently I set the scheduled posting settings wrong. We are almost 1 week into Camp NaNo (which, for those who don't know, is a more flexible version of NaNoWriMo. Click the links for more information) which means, given my goal of 30,000 words, I should've written 5,000 by now. … Continue reading WIP Wednesday: Camp NaNoWriMo

7 Tips for Writing a Book Blurb

I’ve read multiple times that blurbs are things people struggle with. Here’s some tips and a useful formula!

Writers After Dark

7-tips-to-write-book-blurbI’m here to help stop the madness. You know the one. The insanity that accompanies the “fun” of writing a book blurb. Attacking is more like it . . . I could stab it upside the head if it had one. But alas. Don’t let my bitterness get to you. In fact, use it to rise above me . . . with my own help, ironically. So let’s just get straight to it:

What on earth is a book blurb and why do you need one?

A book blurb is an important tool in convincing your readers to buy your book. Essentially, it’s a sales pitch. And you want it to be KILLER.

A reader will browse the shelves (or Kindle), and will find themselves intrigued by that amazing book cover of yours. Yay! You caught their attention. But you need more than that. You need to make…

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