A Short Story: The Cupid’s Dilemma

Thought I would share with you a piece I wrote for a fiction writing class at Uni last year, about a teenage cupid-in-training. My teacher wasn't happy with it, but hopefully y'all will be at least mildly entertained.   The Cupid’s Dilemma   Being a teenager is complicated enough. Leslie thought it was wholly unfair … Continue reading A Short Story: The Cupid’s Dilemma

On Filter Words – by Shaelin Bishop

You may or may not have seen me talking about Shaelin Bishop before; she's one of my favourite writers on youtube and I watched a video by her that is really important and incredibly helpful for editing your manuscript that I wanted to share with you all. It's only 5 minutes of your time, and I … Continue reading On Filter Words – by Shaelin Bishop

Why You Should Consider Completely Scrapping Chapter One

Let's talk about the first chapter of a book and the reasons why I scrap chapter one. Chapter One: The Beginning. The first words of a story, the first scenes and events - for me - are equivalent to dipping your toes in the water, a temperature test, an experiment in preparation. Obviously, this will … Continue reading Why You Should Consider Completely Scrapping Chapter One

Disappearing Act

I pulled another vanishing act this past month or so. Due to personal life struggles, I decided to take a break from... well, everything. I packed a bag and went away for two weeks, ignoring all social media so I could focus on myself for a while. It was much needed and properly enjoyed, but … Continue reading Disappearing Act

Useful Tips for Self-Editing a Manuscript

Sorry I haven’t been writing original content of late; I’ll talk through it during my next WIP Wednesday blog.

A Writer's Path

 

by Emily Nemchick

Whilst there is no substitute for hiring a professional editor, self-editing is an important skill for any writer to hone. For one thing, the more passes a manuscript gets, the fewer errors will remain in the final product. If you are using an editor, be sure to self-edit thoroughly first so they can focus on the things you have missed. If you are not using an editor, then self-editing is doubly essential. Here are a few tips to make sure you catch as many errors as possible.

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How to Stop Feeling Ashamed of Old Writing Projects #ASMSG #SundayBlogShare

BlondeWriteMore

A few years ago your old writing project was the best thing ever. It put a spring in your step and a twinkle in your eye. At the time of writing this great literary masterpiece you were positive it would be the turning point in your literary career.

You spent hours, days, weeks and months working on this project. It was all you talked about and everyone around you was given a regular update on its progress, whether they wanted one or not. When you were not working on it you were busy daydreaming about…getting stuck in a lift with a literary agent, sneaking it out of your bag (all 300 A4 sheets) and whilst they were hammering on the lift emergency button you would whisper,“whilst wewait to be rescued, youcould read something I wrote…earlier…(cough cough)”.

Roll forward to the present day. The love you had for this project…

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Filter Words and Phrases to Avoid in Writing Fiction…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Filter words act like a veil between the reader and the character

by Kathy Steinemann  on Anne R. Allen site:

This article provides a list of writing filters, with practical examples of how to replace them. You’ll also find exercises that can double as story prompts.

All words exist for a reason. Use them wisely to create engaging narrative.

Why the fuss?

Filter words form a barrier that distances readers from a story.

Bertie felt the warm sand between her toes as she walked.

Bertie’s experience is relayed secondhand. When word economy is critical, this approach works. However, wouldn’t you rather become so involved that you almost feel it yourself?

With a few tweaks, we can strengthen the sentence.

The sand trickled between Bertie’s toes, radiating warmth with every step she took.

Strong verbs, trickled and radiating, amplify the sensory impact.

Five senses? Six? Twelve?

Most people can name…

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On Microfiction

Microfiction is such a fascinating form of story telling. With a finite number of words, every syllable is vital. In my post Story Classifications, I discuss typical length of microfiction and the 6 word story. In reality, we see microfiction all the time. You see, microfiction is rarely (if ever?) a complete start-to-finish story - … Continue reading On Microfiction